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Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple (1984-2007)

August 8th, 2007 by Maxim · 3 Comments · 6,187 Views

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4/5

I was a big fan of these BBC series when they were broadcast on TV in the 80s. When I was a kid I was hungry for all sorts of detective stories, especially of Agatha Christie’s books. I’ve seen TV version of Miss Marple produced in other countries, by who’s to play a little old English lady better then an authentic old English lady?

Miss Marple is a “little old lady” from an English village. She spent most of her life there and judges the world through the prism of her little village. Despite her old age, she’s very sharp and bright. Since there isn’t much to do in the village between working in the little rose garden and sipping tea over the daily newspaper at her neighbors, she had all her life to perfect her observational skills. In addition to that, her “lady” status allows her to talk to all sorts of people and ask questions without causing any mistrust and tension some people feel when talking to police detectives. All these qualities make her a perfect detective.

The series were also televised here in US, but another Agatha Christie’s character had become more popular, especially on A&E channel: “Poirot”. In my humble opinion, Miss Marple is way cooler: Poirot is too self-involved.

In the 80s Miss Jane Marple’s role was played by Joan Hickson, later replaced by Geraldine McEwan, who wasn’t as good. Hickson was absolutely brilliant in this role. I was happy to find these series on DVD on Netflix. Watching the episodes I saw in my childhood definitely adds to the charm of Miss Marple.

It’s not a masterpice or a breakthrough in cinematography, but it makes a great and easy-going experience for “dinner and the movie” or a late night watching or something to watch by the fire on a long winter night. It will definitely satisfy most fans of Agatha Christie’s detective stories.

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Rated 4/5 on Aug 8 2007
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Tags: DVD · Detective/Mistery · Movies · Mystery · Serial Films · TV

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3 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Maxim // Jul 1, 2008 at 4:18 am


    This comment was originally posted at 21:42 on 9th August 2007.nnIt could not have been: Agatha Christie published the first Poirot book, “The Mysterious Affair at Styles”, in 1920, and her first Miss Marple in 1930. I believe that the opposite is true, or at least plausible: that the character of retired English teacher who becomes crime mystery writer and solves real murders is a rip off of Miss Marple, which uses Beverly Hills as the setting as opposed to an English village.rn

  • 2 Tom // Aug 9, 2007 at 9:16 pm

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    Isn’t Miss Marple just a rip off of Murder She Wrote?

  • 3 Maxim // Aug 9, 2007 at 9:42 pm

    Reply  |  Quote


    It could not have been: Agatha Christie published the first Poirot book, “The Mysterious Affair at Styles”, in 1920, and her first Miss Marple in 1930. I believe that the opposite is true, or at least plausible: that the character of retired English teacher who becomes crime mystery writer and solves real murders is a rip off of Miss Marple, which uses Beverly Hills as the setting as opposed to an English village.

  • 4 “Murder she said” night | Maxim's Movie Reviews and Opinions Blog // Sep 11, 2008 at 8:53 pm


    [...] Miss Jane Marple (Joan Hickson) solves another string of diabolical murders in this collection of episodes from the hit BBC series featuring Agatha Christie’s literary legend. Cloaked in a prim exterior, the spinster sleuth – a shrewd student of human nature – works her magic in her hometown of St. Mary Mead and in nearby villages. No riddle is too complicated, no case too strange, no perpetrator too smart for her keen, observant mind. [...]

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